Review: Queen of Coin & Whispers by Helen Corcoran

Having just attended Helen Corcoran’s virtual launch (a mark of the times!) for her debut ‘Queen of Coin & Whispers’ I decided it was high time I shared my thoughts on this wonderful book. Thanks to O’Brien Press for sending me an ARC of the book. During lockdown I purchased a copy of the finished book online from the lovely Gutter Bookshop.

Queen of Coin and Whispers

Image from O’Brien Press

Queen of Coin and Whispers

Helen Corcoran

O’Brien Press, 2020

YA – fantasy

Lia has been newly crowned as queen of a corrupt state. She is passionate and idealistic, determined to reform her kingdom and be a better ruler than her uncle was. However, this is complicated by her growing attraction to Xania, her new spymaster. Xania is an intelligent and determined young woman, who has taken on the role of spymaster in a bid to avenge her father’s murder. The love that blooms between them complicates things, and they must decide what they are willing to sacrifice. With political intrigue throughout the Court and hidden enemies everywhere, they face danger and betrayal at every turn.

This was a brilliant, pacey and intriguing story. The world building is luscious and detailed – I particularly loved the mythology in the book around the Midsummer Ball.  The costuming in the book is also incredible, and tells so much about the characters, their identities and their place in the Court. The world of the book is also wonderfully diverse. There are many people of colour represented in the book – both with Xania and many minor characters.  There is excellent representation of queer relationships, and I love how well represented LGBTQ+ characters were in the book. These relationships are also completely normal and accepted in this world. Thus this world is aspirational, while also having a range of characters for LGBTQ+ readers to identify with. This is a book I wish had been around when I was a teenager, and it was so meaningful to me now.

The dual narration created two compelling narrative trends, and allowed each main character become fully rounded and developed. I adored the central characters – I loved Lia’s idealism and Xania’s stubborn nature. I shipped them with every fibre of my being. Helen Corcoran is queen of the slow burning romance, I have never been so thrilled by two characters’ hands brushing! The connection between them is intense and feels authentic. I loved how a sapphic novel brought them together! 

‘She loved me as I loved her, fierce as a bloodied blade.’

Of course, this review has to mention the stunning cover designed by Emma Byrne. It really captures the spirit of  the book, while also being very eye-catching. The rose motif links to the setting of the book, and the embossed matte foil is lush.

I would highly recommend this book for fantasy fans, particularly those looking for novels featuring queer relationships and strong, authentic female protagonists. I cannot wait to read more from Helen Corcoran.

Review: I Was Born For This by Alice Oseman

I’ve been following Alice Oseman’s books since her debut, Solitaire, and I’m a fan of her very modern and diverse YA. I interviewed Alice Oseman when Radio Silence was released, check out the interview here and my reviews of Solitaire and Radio Silence.

The publisher sent me a copy of this book in exchange for a review, the opinions expressed below are honest and my own.

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Angel Rahimi is obsessed with The Ark, the boy band who are taking the world by storm. The Ark are her world – she reads fanfiction about them, tweets about them and makes up theories about their relationships. She has travelled to London to meet her friend Juliet, who she knows through the online fandom, in person for the first time. Together, they are going to actually get to meet The Ark, who they refer to as ‘our boys’.

For Jimmy Kaga-Ricci, one of the boys in The Ark, their rise to fame has been less than dazzling. He loves playing music with Rowan and Lister, but the media frenzy has his anxiety spiralling out of control. His band mates aren’t faring too well either – Lister is drinking too much, and Rowan’s relationship is showing the strain. Is the major new contract they are about to sign a blessing or a curse?

Told in alternating chapters from Angel and Jimmy’s points of view, this is a wonderfully diverse exploration of fandom, friendship, mental health and self worth. It is an entertaining read, and Oseman’s care to represent her protagonists’ experiences authentically and sensitively really shows. With a hijabi teenage girl and a gay transgender boy at its centre, this book is diverse but in a way that is far from tokenistic. Neither character is defined by their faith, sexuality or gender but are rounded and well developed, although I felt the complexities of Angel’s relationship with herself could have been explored more. Jimmy’s anxiety and paranoia is almost painful to read, and I really feel we got into his head. I didn’t feel as much of a connection to Angel.

I loved how I Was Born For This engages with fandom and fan culture, and the intensity of love and passion fans can have. For this, and its queer representation, this is definitely a book I would recommend. Radio Silence remains my favourite of Oseman’s books though!

 

Author Interview: Sophie Cameron (Out of the Blue)

I loved Sophie Cameron’s debut Out of the Blue, which explores grief and loss through magical realism, as well as featuring a beautifully-told love story. I was delighted to get the opportunity to interview Sophie Cameron and ask her about her writing process and LGBTQ+ representation in YA.

Sophie CameronOut of the Blue 9781509853168.jpg

Jenny Duffy: The title Out of the Blue fits the book so well – in terms of grief, the suddenness of the Beings’ falls. Did you have this title all along, or did it come later in the process?


Sophie Cameron: I actually had a really hard time finding a title! I tried out lots (including some really cheesy ones) but nothing really fit. I was thinking about it on my walk to work one morning when I spotted a sticker for a community/arts centre in Edinburgh called Out of the Blue – I figured that worked pretty well, and it stuck!

JD: Which part of the story came first – the magical elements, the characters or the themes?


SC: The idea of the angels falling to earth came first (from a Lynx Deodorant advert, randomly enough) and then the characters. I never really think about the themes I want to include in a book at first; I try to focus on the characters and the story and let them arise naturally, then work on bringing the themes out later.


JD: I loved the scene in which Teacake is shown paintings of angels, were there particular images you used for reference when imagining the Beings?

SC: Their colouring was inspired by street artists in Barcelona: I used to walk past golden and silver angels every day on my way to work, which gave me the idea of making them different metallic colours. Otherwise I just invisioned them as looking like people with wings, but all the paintings mentioned in the book are based on real works of art. It was really fun to research!


JD: What are some of your favourite LGBTQ+ YA books?

SC: More Than This by Patrick Ness, You Know Me Well by Nina LaCour and David Levithan, History is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera, We Are Okay by Nina LaCour, Girlhood by Cat Clarke, Noah Can’t Even by Simon James Green, It’s Not Like It’s a Secret by Misa Sugiura, The Summer of Jordi Perez by Amy Spalding… and I’m really looking forward to Anger is a Gift by Mark Oshiro, Running With Lions by Julian Winters and Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up With Me by Mariko Tamaki and Rosemary Valero-O’Connell, which are all out this year.


JD: In the book Jaya says ‘There were all those words – labels that we didn’t need, but that wrapped themselves around us, suffocating whatever it was that we had.’ What are you own feelings on labels? Do you see them as helpful or damaging, or both?


SC: I think they can be restrictive for some, but empowering for others. Finding the right label was important for me when I was younger as it helped me work out who I was, but I don’t find them quite so important (for myself) now, and I know some people who have never wanted or needed them – either position is totally valid, so I think it’s good to show characters who both do and don’t identify with labels in books.

JD: Different characters in Out of the Blue have very different responses to their sexuality, in terms of acceptance and coming out. Were you very conscious of the importance of showing a range of experiences?


SC: Actually, not really… it just happened naturally as it fit the story. Obviously different people will have hugely different experiences with regards to coming out or being accepted for their sexuality, and if books reflect that then that’s great. But I don’t think authors should necessarily feel they have to show that variety, either. It can be too much to fit into one story, for one thing, and I also think we need more stories with LGBTQ+ characters that don’t touch on issues at all.

JD: The relationship between Jaya and Allie has a beautifully slow build – what do you think is the most important ingredient in writing a romance?


SC: For me, I think it’s that the characters’ relationship feels quite balanced and that they both have their own arcs outside of the other person – my favourite romance in YA is The Sun is Also a Star, where both characters have their own storylines that become intertwined. Romance isn’t usually the main draw to a book for me, though, so it may be totally different for other readers!

JD: What would you like to see more of in YA?


SC: I think the most pressing issue in YA is a lack of books by authors of colour – there are only a handful published in the UK every year, so I want to see many more of those and lots of support for those that are published. I’d also like to see more diversity in general, and more stories that are focused on friendship or sibling relationships.

JD: What’s next for you writing wise?

SC: I’ve just finished the second draft of my second book, which will be out in 2019. I’m having a wee break to catch up on reading and then I’ll get started on what will hopefully be Book 3!


JD: Finally, a piece of writing advice you would pass on?

SC: The author Kirsty Logan mentioned in a talk a few years ago that she aims to write just 100 words a day, so I tried that and it worked really well for me: it’s short enough as a goal that even if I’m feeling totally uninspired (or lazy) I can usually manage a few sentences, and quite often I end up writing way more than I’d intended anyway.