#PULPstories tour Robin Talley Q&A

I am loving Robin Talley’s latest book Pulp, and was delighted to be asked to take part in the #PULPstories tour. I will be reviewing the book on the blog next week, for now, here’s a Q&A with wonderful author Robin Talley.

Robin-Talley-High-Res-200x300Pulp.JPG

What inspired you to write PULP?

I first learned about lesbian pulp fiction — a genre of books popular in the 1950s and 1960s that were published as cheap paperbacks and marketed to men, but that focused on romances between women — several years ago. When I first read one of these books, Marijane Meaker’s groundbreaking Spring Fire, published in 1952, I was mesmerized, both by the story itself and by the world it presented. It focused on the relationship between two deeply closeted lesbians living in a time when being who they were meant having to go to extreme lengths to keep their sexuality a secret, and facing horrific consequences if they slipped up (which of course they did). There was an entire wave of these novels, some of which sold millions of copies, all during a time and place when anyone who didn’t conform to expected norms faced terrible oppression. I wanted to explore that culture, and I thought it would be interesting to look at it through the lens of a teenage character in the present day — someone to whom all of this would seem like irrelevant ancient history, until she probes a little deeper and finds out it’s anything but.

 

Why do you think it’s important to feature LGBT characters in YA novels?

In the decades since young adult books became a publishing phenomenon, there have been only a small percentage of YA books published with lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender characters in central roles. That number is starting to increase at last, but we’ve still got many years’ worth of catching up to do. LGBT teenagers deserve to see characters like themselves in the books they read, and they, as well as teens who don’t fall under the LGBT umbrella, both want and need to see characters who reflect the real world they live in — a world that’s diverse in terms of sexual orientation and gender as well as race and ethnicity, religion, and disability status.

 

What do you hope readers will take away from Pulp?

That the social justice struggles of the twentieth century might seem like the distant past, but the truth is, we’re still fighting the same battles now that we confronted then. The movement for equality has been going on for many, many generations, and there’s no question that we’ve got a long way to go. We have to be mindful of what came before us so we don’t repeat the mistakes of the past, and so we can fight back against the political leaders and others in power who are trying to take us there on purpose.

Check out the rest of the stops on the #PULPStories tour below:

PULP_BlogTour V2

 

 

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